Tim Spurling

paste makes perfect

Have you ever been in a situation where you wanted to copy a load of things and paste them somewhere else?

It happens to me quite frequently. When copying some highly repetitive declarations between Java files, for instance, or when grabbing some Git hashes for a complicated diff.

In Mac OS, this is pretty annoying, as the clipboard can only hold one thing—so you have to be constantly switching windows:

  • ⌘C
  • mouse
  • ⌘V
  • mouse
  • ⌘C
  • mouse
  • ⌘V
  • mouse…

The pain is slightly reduced by a big monitor as you can at least get two windows next to each other, but it’s still unnecessarily repetitive and involves far too much mouse.

“Wouldn’t it be nice”, we nerdily wonder to ourselves, “to have a clipboard stack, like Emacs or Vim or whatever does?”

Yes, it would:
ClipMenu in use

Behold ClipMenu!* Just bind a sensible shortcut in its preferences, and suddenly instead of ⌘C mouse ⌘V mouse ⌘C mouse ⌘V… you have, for example:

  • ⌘C
  • mouse
  • ⌘C
  • mouse
  • ⌘C
  • mouse
  • ⌘C
  • mouse…
  • ⌃⌘V ⏎
  • ⌃⌘V 2 ⏎
  • ⌃⌘V 4 ⏎
  • ⌃⌘V 3 ⏎

Much better.

It also has the ability to take things you’ve copied and store them more permanently as snippets for quick access, which is quite handy for things like API keys or other auth strings.

By the way, an equally delicious implementation exists for Windows. (KDE users will probably be laughing because they have all this stuff by default.)

Enjoy, cheers, and goodbye!

* By the way, isn’t my shell prompt nice?!

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